COVID-19 Community Information Center

When you can safely be around people again after having COVID-19

If you have, or think you might have COVID-19, it is important to stay home and away from other people. Staying away from others helps stop the spread of COVID-19. When you can be around others depends on different factors for different situations.

If you think or know you had COVID-19, and had symptoms

You can be around others after 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared and you are free of a fever for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medications. Your symptoms must also be improving. 

Based on the factors listed above, most people will know when it’s safe to be around others without needing a test to prove they are no longer contagious. But your doctor, school or employer may recommend or require that you be tested before you can resume being around others.

You tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms

If you continue to have no symptoms, you can be with others after 10 days have passed from when you tested positive. Like stated above, most people will know when it’s safe to be around others without needing a test to prove they are no longer contagious. But your doctor, school or employer may recommend or require that you be tested before you can resume being around others.

If you develop symptoms after testing positive, follow the guidance for “If you think or know you had COVID-19, and had symptoms.”

You were severely ill with COVID-19 or have a severely weakened immune system due to a health condition or medication

People who are severely ill with COVID-19 might need to stay home longer than 10 days, sometimes up to 20 days after symptoms first appeared. According to the CDC if you are severely immunocompromised, you may need testing to determine when it’s safe for you to be around others. 

If you have been around a person with COVID-19

Anyone who has had close contact with someone with COVID-19 should stay home for 14 days after their last exposure to that person.

However, if you have had close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 and you developed COVID-19 within the previous 3 months, have recovered and have not developed symptoms (for example, cough, shortness of breath), you do not need to stay home.

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